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Ultimate FAQ About Spaying your Dog – 43 Questions, Answered.

August 9, 2021
August 9, 2021

Spaying your puppy is a really big deal. 

As a result? It comes with a butt load of questions, and understandably so. 

It’s undoubtedly always best for you to understand what’s happening in the procedure and sometimes you can walk away from your vet feeling like you understand, but questions arise over time and that’s when we turn to other sources.

Sometimes these sources aren’t always that reliable, so I want to help you guys with your questions. I’ve taken some questions from my Rebarkable Paw-rents, and I’ve asked Instagram followers, and I’ve pulled a bunch of data from other sources to make sure that this post answers everything you can think of. 

I’ve broken it into 5 categories, The Fundamentals, When…, The Surgery, Aftercare, and Financials. This way I can try and tackle all the points of confusion that happen with spaying. My goal is to get you making the very best decision for your little ladies!

Feel free to not read every point and skip around the article, satisfy your questions, and if you’ve not got your question answered by the end? Email me and I’ll include it ASAP! 

There will also be a bit of repetition in this, because sometimes the questions boil down to quite similar things.

The Spay surgery is tough on dogs, so figure out if it's right for you
The Spay surgery is tough on dogs, so figure out if it’s right for you and your pup

Caveat 

This article is aimed at my audience of responsible puppy parents. I aim to help create informed puppy parents who are confident, capable and knowledgeable in order to make the very best decisions for their dogs. This is all part of becoming a phenomenal guardian for their dog, and their dogs best advocate. 

I support a learning process. That’s my ethos with everything, to make you the very best puppy parent you can be, with this blog and with tools like my puppy development emails, Pupdates.

This is not for you if: 

❌ You will read without consideration
❌ You are militant about your stance on spaying and neutering (be it positive or negative)
❌ You are not intending on being your dogs best advocate. 

Table Of Contents
  1. Fundamentals
  2. 1 – What Is “Spaying” A Dog?
  3. 2 – How To Spay My Dog/Puppy?
  4. 3 – Why Should I Spay My Dog/Puppy?
  5. 4 – Why Shouldn’t I Spay My Dog?
  6. 5 – Is It Recommended To Spay A Dog
  7. 6 – Should I Spay My Dog/Puppy Or Not? 
  8. 7 – Is It Better To Spay A Dog Or Not?
  9. 8 – Is It Cruel To Spay A Dog?
  10. 9 – What Should I Expect When I Get My Dog Spayed?
  11. 10 – Where Should I Go To Get My Dog Spayed?
  12. 11 – Where Can I Get My Dog Spayed For Free?
  13. 12 – Who Can Spay My Dog?
  14. 13 – How Can I Spay My Dog At Home?
  15. 14 – Can A Spayed Dog Still Have a Period Or Experience Estrus?
  16. 15 – Dog Spay Vs Neuter
  17. When…
  18. 16 – When Can I Spay My Dog If She’s In Heat?
  19. 17 – Can You Spay A Dog After Her First Heat?
  20. 18 – Why Should I Spay My Dog After Her First Heat?
  21. 19 – When Can You Spay A Dog?
  22. 20 – Can You Spay A Dog After She’s Mated?
  23. 21 – Can You Spay A Dog After She Has Puppies?
  24. 22 – Can You Spay A Dog Whilst She’s Pregnant
  25. 23 – Can You Spay A Dog At Any Age?
  26. 24 – Can You Spay A Dog With A Heart Murmur
  27. The Surgery
  28. 25 – Is Spaying Your Dog Safe?
  29. 26 – Is Spaying A Dog A Surgery?
  30. 27 – Can You Spay A Dog Without Surgery?
  31. 28 – What Is Spaying A Dog With A Laser? 
  32. 29 – Can You Spay A Dog Without Anesthesia?
  33. 30 – Do Vets Remove The Uterus When Spaying A Dog?
  34. 31 – Is Spaying The Same As A Hysterectomy?
  35. 32 – Dog Spay Vs Tubal Ligation, What’s the Difference?
  36. 33 – Dog Spay Vs Human Hysterectomy – What’s the difference? 
  37. After Care 
  38. 34 – Are Spayed Dogs Prone To Incontinence? 
  39. 35 – Should We Use A Cone After Our Dog Is Spayed?
  40. 36 – Are There Any Alternatives For the Cone Of Shame?
  41. 37 – Keeping Your Puppy Entertained After Being Spayed.
  42. 38 – Are Drugs Ever A Good Idea After Your Dog Is Spayed?
  43. 39 – Will Spaying My Puppy Make Her Calmer?
  44. 40 – Will Spaying My Puppy Change Her Behaviour?
  45. Financials Of Spaying Your Dog
  46. 41 – Is Spaying My Dog Covered By Insurance?
  47. 42 – How Much Does Spaying A Dog Cost? 
  48. 43 – Can I Get My Dog Spayed For Free?
  49. Ta-dah! And Thats The Ultimate FAQ About Spaying Your Dog! 

Fundamentals

This section will cover the ‘core’ considerations and explanations associated with spaying so that we can start off on the right paw and move into some of the more complex issues as we go through the article. 

1 – What Is “Spaying” A Dog?

A “spay” is (simply put) the process by which your dog is rendered surgically unable to breed. This sterilization technique most commonly includes the removal of: 

  • The Ovaries 
  • The Fallopian tubes
  • The Uterus

Of your dog in order to remove her ability to reproduce, create hormones, and to stop her going into heat (this is sometimes called her season or estrus). 

2 – How To Spay My Dog/Puppy?

Spaying is done by a veterinary surgeon (and always should be!). It’s quite a simple procedure for a vet, and one that most small animal vets do a lot. Simply put? Your dog will go under anaesthetic and will have her uterus, fallopian tubes and ovaries removed.

Note: At the moment with COVID – there is a lot of demand on vets for time, and waiting lists for surgeries like this can be quite long!  

3 – Why Should I Spay My Dog/Puppy?

Spaying comes with a few fairly valuable benefits: 

✅ The removed organs cannot become cancerous

✅ The Uterus is at risk of becoming infected in a life threatening condition called Pyometra.
✅ Unwanted pregnancies cannot occur
✅ Her desire to breed will be removed
✅ She’ll not go into her estrus cycle (which is messy)
✅ She won’t attract roaming males

The two of these that are considered the most important are the cancer risk, and the avoiding accidental litter of puppies – but the others are equally important considerations in my books. 

To me? I ask all my puppy parents and readers to consider a few things before spaying their girls.

Resting is really critical after any surgery, and definitely the case with spaying
Resting is really critical after any surgery, and definitely the case with spaying


🐾 Is she biologically predisposed to cancer? 

This sounds a little intense? But it’s really, very true. I always encourage people to talk to their breeder about cancer in the breeding line and see if this is a particular risk when it comes to their puppy. Afterall, each woof is an individual! 


🐾 Consider Her Breed.

Some breeds have a higher propensity towards cancer, others towards hip or elbow dysplasia, or cruciate ligament issues. If you don’t know your dogs lineage, then knowing what sort of stock they come from is a great idea. For example? A golden retriever is quite prone to cancer, so, it would often be my advise that spaying a golden retriever is in yours and her best interest – but of course – breeder information comes above all of this.

🐾 Are You Going To Be Responsible?

I mean, generally speaking, if you’re reading this, you’re almost certainly a very responsible puppy parent, however, if you do not think you are capable of keeping your girl safe, secure, and out of reach of wandering males (whether in your yard, land, or at the park) then I would sincere advise you do this earlier rather than later.

4 – Why Shouldn’t I Spay My Dog?

Spaying is a hard procedure, if your girl has any existing medical issues like a heart murmur, or anything to which anaesthesia will cause problems? Then this may not be for you. 

The other instances where you shouldn’t spay your dog is: 

  • If your dog is going to be bred (please read this first!)
  • If your willing to be responsible for her, every estrus cycle.
  • You don’t have intact males at home.

5 – Is It Recommended To Spay A Dog

This is a great question. Your vet will almost always adamantly tell you you need to, and that you need to get it done ASAP. 

I don’t agree with that? 

Why? Well… okay now you’ve gone and done it, huh?
Puppy development is a hugely important thing. And whilst I am not a vet I do understand development. 

Your puppy goes through 8 different development phases in the first year. 

She’ll probably have her first season.

She’s going to learn hundreds of things.
She’s going to experience thousands of smells.

Her brain’s volume is expanding rapidly. 

My whole focus is to make sure that those fundamental pieces happen, that they happen positively and with your guidance your little girl avoids her future issues.

So here’s where this gives me grief.

This surgery is almost always a negative experience for your dog. And, to make it worse, she’s normally in her second fear phase when vets suggest this happens.
Yikes. 

How do you honestly expect that fallout to go? At minimum she’s going to get scared of the vets office, at worst? It could push her towards reactivity.

So, my opinion stands as follows:

Wait as long as you can, until you’re certain that the puppy development phases are passed and you’re into a firm, confident, capable adult mode. 

limiting exercise does not mean limiting their experience of the world. Get creative with your solutions to providing limited exercise
limiting exercise does not mean limiting their experience of the world. Get creative with your solutions to providing limited exercise

6 – Should I Spay My Dog/Puppy Or Not? 

Ultimately? This is up to you. 

You are her guardian, you are responsible for her and any offspring she has. You’re also the one who will be responsible for vets bills for emergency abort & spay procedures, or for any potential litters. This is a pretty huge weight. 

And if you’re not sure why it’s a large responsibility? Then please read this – we only need responsible breeders in this day and age. No puppy mills or backyard breeders who are only contributing to rescues, and giving families more training problems. 

The reasons for spaying (at an appropriate age) are strong. The reasons not to spay? Are less strong in my mind. 

7 – Is It Better To Spay A Dog Or Not?

This thoroughly depends on your goals with your dog. If they’re a pet, they have minimal history of problems, and they’re emotionally sound and stable – and you can be responsible? Then I’d argue this is your choice.

If they are not sound (mentally or physically), are prone to cancer, or have genetic issues in their line (such as seizures) it may be best to make certain that your girl cannot breed. 

And, of course, if you’re not willing to deal with roaming males, if you’re not willing to deal with the mess a female in her season is probably to make, or the emotional side of it that your dog will go through (yes, even dogs get a little grumpy at this time!) then I’d err on the side of saying it’s better to spay.

8 – Is It Cruel To Spay A Dog?

No. 

The procedure is relatively pain free, only the aftercare part is a little more sore and potentially problematic if it gets infected. The procedure is not cruel though, and in some instances i the most humane thing you can do for your girl. 

9 – What Should I Expect When I Get My Dog Spayed?

It’s a really good question! 

Naturally, each dog’s experience varies, as do a lot of vets. But, normally, you’ll book your appointment. You’ll withhold food for 12 to 24hrs before you go to the vets. You’ll head to the vets. They take her weight, and other important info, you’ll see a vet and he or she will double check all is well for them to proceed. 

Your girl will then go through to a new area, usually kennels, where she’ll wait (this is potentially a stressor for some dogs, and if you see this being a problem, you can request that they’re the first one in the proverbial ‘queue’ for the procedure to stop them panicking). They’ll aneasthetise your dog (this is usually done initially with an injection) then your dog will go under, be given anaesthesia via a mask or tube and the surgery will begin. 

Your dog will be closed up, and be allowed to slowly wake up from the anaesthetic. 

Your vet will check that they’re all okay, and you will be called to come and pick up your dog.

Outside of this? You can expect them to be very groggy when they come home. 

You may have to excuse toileting accidents too. 

It is best to give them space and a comfortable bed. 

They may be extra whiney or clingy too. 

Try to be extra patient with them, because it is going to be a bit of a rough couple of days.

(laser or Keyhole surgery heals a lot faster than regular surgery, and makes this recovery time significantly quicker.

limited on leash walks can be done after some initial recovery, just remember to keep it short and unexciting whilst recovering from the spay surgery
limited on leash walks can be done after some initial recovery, just remember to keep it short and unexciting whilst recovering from the spay surgery

10 – Where Should I Go To Get My Dog Spayed?

It will always be a vet, though that vet may be located at a charity or animal rescue, or at their normal veterinary office.  Though I would advise that you try and get local recommendations for a great vet, and if they give you bad vibes? Then go elsewhere. 

There’s no harm in shopping around to find the right Vet! Afterall, they should appreciate that you’re looking out for your dogs best interests and are happy to meet all the expectations that implies, and treat you as a knowledgeable individual, not just as someone to preach to. 

11 – Where Can I Get My Dog Spayed For Free?

Some animal charities will offer low cost or free spaying to prevent the population of dogs from surging and essentially limiting their amount of future work (they’re often rescues too). Sometimes these spots are saved for those of lower income and/or happen on specific days/times so please do be prepared to answer questions or follow their lead on these things. 

12 – Who Can Spay My Dog?

Only a licenced veterinarian can perform surgical operations on a dog. Please only go to a vet!

13 – How Can I Spay My Dog At Home?

You can’t! This is not a DIY procedure (and trust me, I’m happy to take on ear cuts and things myself) – but this is not something you can do at home. You will risk your dogs life, and could also get grievously injured in the process. Please leave this to Licenced professionals.

14 – Can A Spayed Dog Still Have a Period Or Experience Estrus?

Actually, yes. If an ovarian remnant is left over after the spay surgery is complete, or there has been a small extra fragment that may have always been there. This may occur. The small remnant will need a good blood flow in order to begin distributing hormones again. This can result in the appearance of estrus-like symptoms! This can occur months to years after the original surgery and should be looked at by a vet.
Again, as always, I’m not a vet, but the VCA are – and this is their advise when it comes to Ovarian Remnants.

15 – Dog Spay Vs Neuter

This pretty much boils down to gender specificity? Neutering is for male dogs, and Spaying is for female dogs. There is more technical info to it? But I don’t feel like it’s really pertinent information that we need to discuss. It’s a little too geeky – even for me.

When…

This is kind of a bit that goes into all the whens, the variables about when your dog gets spayed.

16 – When Can I Spay My Dog If She’s In Heat?

Your vet will not spay a dog who is in heat (if they say they do, run!). You’ll have to wait at least 4 weeks from the start of her cycle for her to be completely done, though, it’s always good to wait a little longer to make sure she’s totally clear, and then your vet will proceed with the agreed surgery (please note that breed size really matters in terms of how frequent their seasons/heats/estrus is, larger dogs can go 12 months between seasons, whilst small dogs can be as quick as every 4 months, make sure to book appropriately!)

17 – Can You Spay A Dog After Her First Heat?

Absolutely you can – but the question becomes whether you should. Please consider development phases for your pup, as well as potential growth issues, cancer rates that may run in the family, or similar risks. 

If you’re looking for the Best time to spay or neuter your dog, please check out this post which acts as the hub for specific breed information to best arm you with data.

The cone of shame on a labrador. This is one of options to protect your dog from licking their incision site and allowing it to heal nicely.
The cone of shame on a labrador. This is one of options to protect your dog from licking their incision site and allowing it to heal nicely.

18 – Why Should I Spay My Dog After Her First Heat?

Doing this allows the appropriate systems to do appropriate things and to give the body the experience of the appropriate hormones to give your little lady her transition to adulthood (as such). These hormones help the development of bones, and help shape your dog as they should be (which could help them in the future to be less prone to bone disease, dysplasia or cruciate ligament failures).

19 – When Can You Spay A Dog?

Technically? You can spay a dog the moment they’re born – but that wouldn’t be an advisable thing to do. 

Your vet may advocate for getting this done ASAP, but personally? I disagree.
Puppy development is a hugely important thing. And whilst I am not a vet I do understand development. 

Your puppy goes through 8 different development phases in the first year. 

She’ll probably have her first season.

She’s going to learn hundreds of things.
She’s going to experience thousands of smells.

Her brain’s volume is expanding rapidly. 

My whole focus is to make sure that those fundamental pieces happen, that they happen positively and with your guidance your little girl avoids her future issues.

So here’s where this gives me grief.

This surgery is almost always a negative experience for your dog. And, to make it worse, she’s normally in her second fear phase when vets suggest this happens.
Yikes. 

How do you honestly expect that fallout to go? At minimum she’s going to get scared of the vets office, at worst? It could push her towards reactivity.

So, my opinion stands as follows:

Wait as long as you can, until you’re certain that the puppy development phases are passed and you’re into a firm, confident, capable adult mode. 

20 – Can You Spay A Dog After She’s Mated?

You can have both a spay abortion performed and you can spay a female after she’s completed nursing her litter and before her next season. Both of these are options, but, I would really hope we’re not letting this happen, please!

Gentle walks are a great idea after an initial rest! Keep them on leash, and practice a nice loose leash walk
Gentle walks are a great idea after an initial rest! Keep them on leash, and practice a nice loose leash walk

21 – Can You Spay A Dog After She Has Puppies?

Yes! And it;s advisable to do so to prevent further unwanted breeding, and to prevent the risk of pyometra, cancer and a few other nasty little things that can happen. 

22 – Can You Spay A Dog Whilst She’s Pregnant

Yes, you can. It’s a procedure called a spay abortion, and it will result in the loss of the litter also. It is very advisable for accidental matings, and absolutely necessary when there is a significant size difference between the mother dog and the father dog where the father is much larger. 

23 – Can You Spay A Dog At Any Age?

Pretty much, yes. Though, it’s less advisable to do it whilst they’re far too young (under 6 months) and when they’re too old (over 6 years) because it can impact on development, and other similar systems. As a broad, somewhat sweeping statement? I find a fairly applicable time is in the region of 18-24 months. This allows your puppy to develop fully physically, and emotionally before going through this, which minimises the chance of adverse outcomes. 

If you want some more breed specific recommendations based on actual data about spaying and neutering, head to the summary post here.

24 – Can You Spay A Dog With A Heart Murmur

Most often, vets will get wary about spaying or performing any procedure on dogs with a heart murmur, this is because the anaesthesia presents a greater risk to them. 

The Surgery

25 – Is Spaying Your Dog Safe?

Yep! As the procedure goes? The risk of death (yikes!) is 0.1% according to a 1996 journal (I’m waiting for new stuff!), but generally speaking, it’s really safe! The fallout consequences can be pretty significant and proper consideration should be given to when the procedure is performed with regards to breed, genetics, behaviour, and as much data as you can get!

26 – Is Spaying A Dog A Surgery?

Yep! This can be done with laser, keyhole or by traditional surgery, but it is always considered a surgical procedure.

27 – Can You Spay A Dog Without Surgery?

Sadly, no! It does involve surgery at this stage, there is variation on how it’s done, and I advise you discuss this with your vet (keyhole, laser, hysterectomy, ovariectomy etc), but all of them do involve an operation. Boys have a chemical option that our little ladies currently do not.

28 – What Is Spaying A Dog With A Laser? 

Laser surgery involves using a COlaser. The procedure is mainly the same, but the recovery time is quicker, the blood loss is less, risk of infection and inflamation is less also! If you want to learn more about Laser surgeries here!

backpack walk with a bull terrier puppy
backpack walk with a bull terrier puppy – backpack walks a great way to engage in low exercise high stimulation walks that are nice and calm – perfect for a recovering pup!

29 – Can You Spay A Dog Without Anesthesia?

No. This wouldn’t be a humane way of performing the surgery, it wouldn’t be safe for either the vet or your dog. Any Vet should be using anesthesia in order to sedate your dog whilst this happens.

30 – Do Vets Remove The Uterus When Spaying A Dog?

The traditional spay is the removal of the uterus, fallopian tubes and the ovaries, however variations on the spaying process do exist. Such as a Hysterectomy (the removal of just the uterus) – this leaves the ovaries intact, and means that they keep their hormones which help their development and health generally.

31 – Is Spaying The Same As A Hysterectomy?

No. Whilst both have the effect of sterilising your dog, they vary in what is removed from your dog. A Hysterectomy leaves the ovaries in place, whilst the traditional spay does not.

32 – Dog Spay Vs Tubal Ligation, What’s the Difference?

Both are methods of sterilization, however, the spay removes the reproductive organs within your dog (Uterus, fallopian tubes and ovaries) whilst the Tubal Libation actually just “Ties the tubes” of the dog, meaning that the egg(s) that would get fertilised by the male are not released into the uterus and consequently our little lady cannot get pregnant! It’s good to note that dogs who go through with tubal ligation will produce hormones as normal, and go through their season or heat, and will desire to mate. They will also be appealing to males. 

The only risk associated with this? Is pyometra. It’s a big risk, but there are definitely benefits to keeping your girl as ‘whole’ as possible

33 – Dog Spay Vs Human Hysterectomy – What’s the difference? 

In human women the typical procedure involves only the removal of the uterus, which is different to the typical spay of a female dog which removes the uterus also, but it also normally includes the fallopian tubes and the ovaries.

After Care 

34 – Are Spayed Dogs Prone To Incontinence? 

It can create a weakness, but the rates are pretty low. 

For more on this, check the central post about specific breeds in order to see how it may affect your girl.

35 – Should We Use A Cone After Our Dog Is Spayed?

You can! They’re definitely a traditional option and one that is effective. However, they do often result in a lot of discomfort for your dogs, they also often result in chunks of you wall being taken out at every corner, or tight space – because your dogs head is suddenly umpteen times larger than it was.

inflatible doughnut donut collar for a puppy to stop them from opening up the wound from their spay surgery
inflatible doughnut donut collar for a puppy to stop them from opening up the wound from their spay surgery.

36 – Are There Any Alternatives For the Cone Of Shame?

Personally? I strongly recommend a Suitical! They’re a truly wonderful invention that’s essentially a baby-gro for your dog! This means that they keep their wound safe, aren’t able to lick the sutres and can heal in relative comfort! 

Alternatively, you can go for an inflatable (these can pop), or foam ‘doughnut’ that you can attach to their collar which limits their ability to turn their head and lick at the sore spot where the incision was made. 

37 – Keeping Your Puppy Entertained After Being Spayed.

So, gentle activity is something you’ll need to get into for your pup because your vet will say 7 – 14 days of rest are required after surgery. Now… the younger you get this done? The rougher I think you’re going to find this. Especially if you’ve not take the time to encourage calmness before this goes ahead. However! Great ideas for this are:

  • Scentwork
  • Sniffaris
  • Scatterfeeding
  • Hide & Seek
  • Puzzles
  • Search boxes
  • Interactive feeding
    • Kongs
    • Kong Wobblers
    • Toppls
    • Buffalo Horns
  • Gentle games of tug
  • Backpack walks in the yard or other secure field

And dont forget about training new tricks! Whilst initially this might be a little tough (groggy puppies don’t tend to listen that well!) you can also try teaching a paw, lay down, or improving something you’ve already got (that doesn’t involve running or jumping of course).

You can also work on focus and socialization (That doesn’t involve other dogs!). Short walks around stores can be great for this as well as teaching a wonderful loose leash. 

38 – Are Drugs Ever A Good Idea After Your Dog Is Spayed?

Love this question.

For pain? Yes.

However, for behaviour? Please don’t be tempted to get into this. You can’t just medicate your dog into doing what you want her to. Training must always be the first option you present. Exercises like capturing calmness, and making sure that their schedule is right and enough naps are being achieved? Is really important too. 
However, if their overactivity is threatening their wellbeing? Discuss with your vet about your options with CBD.

39 – Will Spaying My Puppy Make Her Calmer?

There is no evidence for this. Whilst it will remove her desire to breed (at least for a traditional spay), there is no evidence that the surgery itself changes personality. Most changes that occur after these surgeries in terms of personality, can likely be associated with another event more than the actual surgery. 

sniffy walks allow your pup to get some exercise and a lot of mental stimulation too.
sniffy walks allow your pup to get some exercise and a lot of mental stimulation too.

40 – Will Spaying My Puppy Change Her Behaviour?

No, there is no current scientific evidence that shows a link between Spaying and behavioural changes.

Financials Of Spaying Your Dog

41 – Is Spaying My Dog Covered By Insurance?

Nope! This is an elective procedure and is so not covered by insurance.
(or at least, I’ve  yet to experience this! So if anyone knows otherwise, let us know!)

42 – How Much Does Spaying A Dog Cost? 

It varies a lot depending on the quality of the vet, the size of your dog and the procedure you choose. Laser surgery will cost more, a large dog will require more anaesthetic and will cost more also.  Low cost options can be free, or a nominal fee. But they can also cost as much as $600. 

Call the vets in the area and compare costs. 

43 – Can I Get My Dog Spayed For Free?

Some places do offer low cost or free options, but often there are requirements that need to be met, low income households may qualify for free, or low cost options, but the spots are often quite limited.

Ta-dah! And Thats The Ultimate FAQ About Spaying Your Dog! 

Phew, this one took me a while to compile, but I hope you find it helpful. I’ve endeavoured to make this as easy for you as possible, I realise, sometimes, more information actually makes things more complicated, but the goal is to bring you and your puppy out of this with the very best result, and I know that’s something you can achieve.

I didn’t. I know I followed veterinary advice and studies recently (and some available then) would have suggested that I was wrong. 

Don’t make my mistake. 

Read as much as you can, make an informed decision. 

If you want to chat about it? I can help. 

I try to help with everything I do, and if you like my approach on this? You’ll love my weekly puppy update emails. We cover development, behaviour, training, grooming medical issues like this too, where I’ll give you all the facts you need to make the best, most informed decision for you and your pup. Let me help guide you through the first year of puppyhood, with Pupdates

Author, Ali Smith

Ali Smith is the Positive Puppy Expert, dog trainer and is the founder of Rebarkable. She is passionate about helping puppy parents get things right, right from the start. To help create a puppy capable of being a confident and adaptable family member and keep puppies out of shelters.

Ali has won multiple awards for her dog training, and has had her blog (this blog!) rated as 2021’s worlds’ best pet blog!

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